always-returning:

D’Est (Chantal Akerman, 1993)

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

Mother and Son — dir. Alexander Sokurov

(Source: strangewood)

13monden:

Walden: Diaries, Notes, and Sketches (Jonas Mekas, 1969)

(via 13monden-deactivated20140826)

importantmodernart:

The Great Machine, 1925Giorgio de Chirico

importantmodernart:

The Great Machine, 1925
Giorgio de Chirico

(via thenightlymirror)

magictransistor:

Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz: They / Oni (Franciszek Starowieyski), 1978.

magictransistor:

Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz: They / Oni (Franciszek Starowieyski), 1978.

(via creativenite)


Fundamentalism will destroy you.  When you become dogmatic, you’re gone.  You stay on one side, in one box, you’re gone.  It’s same thing with our praxis.  My framework is not always the long take.  I don’t want to stay within that kind of framework.  I will adjust it to the story I need to do and to the characters I that I see.  Now you see a lot of close shots, medium shots, shorter takes, because that’s what the scenes need.  There will be long takes because it is needed.  It is not forced.  You can’t be dogmatic and insist that all my shots must be long takes with a big frame.  I don’t want to be part of that, becoming dogmatic within my own praxis, becoming stubborn.  If your cinema is liberated, you can use anything.  Any praxis is valid.
We’re actually planning to do an action film noir film which is so bloody (laughter). I don’t know what is going to happen.  And it’s a musical too where they will sing their lines, stylized but also at the same time with all these elements of film noir: a femme fatale, friends fighting over money, greed, fascism, revenge.  Everything happens at night in the darkness.  I want to play with high contrast, stark characters at the fringes and in the underbelly where they just eat each other and kill each other.  It’s all about hate and blood.  That would be a good film noir to do, but at the same time a musical.  There will be nuances of sadness.  They will have philosophies.  The lines will be poetic.  There will be contrasts.  I don’t know what’s going to happen.  It’s an experiment. 
-Lav Diaz
[Desistfilm]

Fundamentalism will destroy you.  When you become dogmatic, you’re gone.  You stay on one side, in one box, you’re gone.  It’s same thing with our praxis.  My framework is not always the long take.  I don’t want to stay within that kind of framework.  I will adjust it to the story I need to do and to the characters I that I see.  Now you see a lot of close shots, medium shots, shorter takes, because that’s what the scenes need.  There will be long takes because it is needed.  It is not forced.  You can’t be dogmatic and insist that all my shots must be long takes with a big frame.  I don’t want to be part of that, becoming dogmatic within my own praxis, becoming stubborn.  If your cinema is liberated, you can use anything.  Any praxis is valid.

We’re actually planning to do an action film noir film which is so bloody (laughter). I don’t know what is going to happen.  And it’s a musical too where they will sing their lines, stylized but also at the same time with all these elements of film noir: a femme fatale, friends fighting over money, greed, fascism, revenge.  Everything happens at night in the darkness.  I want to play with high contrast, stark characters at the fringes and in the underbelly where they just eat each other and kill each other.  It’s all about hate and blood.  That would be a good film noir to do, but at the same time a musical.  There will be nuances of sadness.  They will have philosophies.  The lines will be poetic.  There will be contrasts.  I don’t know what’s going to happen.  It’s an experiment. 

-Lav Diaz

[Desistfilm]

(Source: onfilmmaking, via communicants)

Need a cinematographer, Tumblr? Check me out.

tarkovskologist:

Martin Scorsese in "A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies (1995)"

(via iwanttobelikearollingstone)

speakingparts:


Kyua [Cure]
Kiyoshi Kurosawa 1997


whereidisthereshallegobe:

The Seventh Seal (1957, dir Ingmar Bergman) “I want to confess as best I can, but my heart is void. The void is a mirror. I see my face and feel loathing and horror. My indifference to men has shut me out. I live now in a world of ghosts, a prisoner in my dreams.”

whereidisthereshallegobe:

The Seventh Seal (1957, dir Ingmar Bergman) “I want to confess as best I can, but my heart is void. The void is a mirror. I see my face and feel loathing and horror. My indifference to men has shut me out. I live now in a world of ghosts, a prisoner in my dreams.”

(Source: clocksblood, via thenightlymirror)

mysteriousobjectatnoon:

Help Me Eros (Lee Kang-sheng, 2007)

(Source: , via communicants)

"I made the film to give all these actions that are typically devalued a life on film. I absolutely had Delphine in mind when I wrote it. I felt that the extraordinary thing was that she was not this character at all. She was quite ‘the lady.’ If we saw someone making beds and doing dishes whom we normally see do these things, we wouldn’t really see that person, just like men are blind to their wives doing dishes. So it had to be someone we didn’t usually see do the dishes. So Delphine was perfect, because it suddenly became visible."

"In movies, what’s supposed to be an effective image, an important image, are crimes, car chases, etc. Not a woman, shown from the back, doing dishes. But that that is on the same level as the murder, in fact, I think its much more dramatic. I think that when she does that (bangs a glass on the table) and you really feel that maybe the milk will spill, that’s as dramatic as the murder.”

"People were a little bit angry at me because of the murder at the end of Jeanne Dielman. She does it and then she sits for seven minutes. And then you don’t understand her. You will never. I hope you never will—that’s the strength of the film. You will never know what is happening in her mind and in her heart. I don’t know either. It’s the secret of Delphine Seyrig, not the character she’s playing. It’s not Jeanne Dielman’s secret, it’s Delphine’s secret.” — Chantal Akerman

(Source: strangewood)

temporalillusion:

From Experimental Cinema in the Digital Age by Malcolm Le Grice:
"7. Concern with duration as a concrete dimension.
…film language has evolved in such a way as to subsume the real time of the film under the illusory time of the narrative - compression of events, flashback and jump-cut… Exactly what our perception of duration entails is difficult to say, but it seems to require unbroken continuity before an event can incorporate an experience of its duration as a factor of awareness. Some film-makers have begun to pay attention to the problem of the real time of their films and to draw the attention of the audience to it… by unbroken continuity… and elimination of editing… or in specific relationship to time manipulation… time-lapse films… or as a concrete dimension with no reference to another time/space.”

temporalillusion:

From Experimental Cinema in the Digital Age by Malcolm Le Grice:

"7. Concern with duration as a concrete dimension.

…film language has evolved in such a way as to subsume the real time of the film under the illusory time of the narrative - compression of events, flashback and jump-cut… Exactly what our perception of duration entails is difficult to say, but it seems to require unbroken continuity before an event can incorporate an experience of its duration as a factor of awareness. Some film-makers have begun to pay attention to the problem of the real time of their films and to draw the attention of the audience to it… by unbroken continuity… and elimination of editing… or in specific relationship to time manipulation… time-lapse films… or as a concrete dimension with no reference to another time/space.”

(via experimentalcinema)

Just Wrapped Principal Photography on my First Feature.

Still have 2 or 3 days of shooting left and I have to edit half the monster, but, fuck. Here I am. I’m two-thirds of the way to having a feature to my name.

What a fucking feeling.

"I’m always fascinated by what comes first: the first films, or one’s first experience of film. Fellini once said that when he first put his eye to the camera, he found that what had seemed certain, familiar, now seemed strange; and that’s true. The earliest image I recall from my filmmaking life was when I began my first feature, Reconstruction, in an old, remote mountain village where a man just back from working as a gastarbeiter in Germany had, like Agamemnon, been murdered by his wife and her lover. I arrived there: it was grey, raining slightly; some old women in black disappeared into the vineyards; I heard someone singing a love song in a distant cafe. And that image, that sound, that rain, perhaps that single moment has influenced all the films I’ve made since!"

Theo Angelopoulos (27 April 1935 - 24 January 2012)

(Source: theoangelo, via communicants)